Your degree in Geological Sciences

While studying geological sciences, you’re learning to examine the Earth, including the composition, structure, physical properties, and history of our planet. You’ll develop important skills while taking advantage of Vancouver’s location as a beautiful, natural geological laboratory.

These skills may include: 

  • Location, identification, classification and extraction of various earth materials and structures
  • Application of the geologic time scale to indicate the order that events on Earth have taken place in
  • Surveying and sampling techniques
  • Field mapping
  • Technical report writing
  • Mathematical modeling and quantitative analysis
  • Computer methods used to analyze geological and geographical data
  • Interpretation of 3D subsurface structures
  • Microscopic petrography and mineral identification

Explore career possibilities

Career opportunities vary widely across a range of fields, including mineral exploration, environmental geoscience, consulting, government agencies, resource management, hydrogeology, community development, research, and others.

There are many career paths that can combine your academics, skills, and experience with your different interests. See the job titles below for ideas, but note that some career options may require further education or training.

Visit the National Occupational Classification website to research basic requirements and responsibilities of jobs in your field.


Agricultural consultant

Assayer

Agrogeologist

Cartographer

Environmental geologist

Exploration geologist

Geodesist

Geographic information systems technician

Geological technician

Geologist

Geomorphologist

Geophysical data technician

Hydrogeologist

Hydrologist

Land surveyor

Laboratory technician

Landscape architect

Lobbyist

Mine geologist

Mineral technician

Mining technologist

Oceanographer

Paleontologist

Petroleum geologist

Sedimentologist

Seismic technician

Seismologist

Toxicologist

Urban planner

Make the most of your specialization

Your experiences will open doors to new opportunities and help clarify understanding of your values and interests.

Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science clubs
Meet other UBC students with similar interests through events and programs.

UBC Sustainability programs and clubs
Browse on-campus paid and volunteer opportunities related to sustainability.

UBC Science Co-op
Gain work experience in geological sciences between study terms.

Departmental research opportunities
Reach out directly to faculty members to ask about potential research positions.

Register as a Professional Geoscientist
Understand the courses you’ll need to become certified for this role.

Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions internships
Apply your classroom knowledge to real-world settings through climate change mitigation or adaptation projects.

Volunteer at the GeoConvention
Network with top industry professionals during the summer term and hear guest speakers at technical talks.

AME Roundup Conference
Attend a mineral exploration industry convention in term 2 and network with professionals.

PDAC Convention
In term 2, attend or volunteer at this mineral exploration and mining convention in Toronto.

MapPlace tool
Use geospatial web services to visualize and analyze geoscience and mineral resource data and maps in British Columbia.

Make connections

Employers often hire people they know, so help them get to know you! You can build your network through clubs, classes, informational interviews, and more. There are so many ways to make connections and find mentors.

The professional associations below are also great resources for meeting people, learning about specific industries, and exploring job and volunteer opportunities. Most have reduced membership rates for students and new grads.

Connect with alumni on LinkedIn

More information

From your Science degree, you’ll develop skills and experiences that can translate into many career paths. Check out other things you can do with your Science degree.